Da Hong Pao Wild-Grown Big Red Robe

$10.00$140.00

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Oolong Tea
yan cha

 

Da Hong Pao Wild-Grown Big Red Robe

 

Appearance: Slightly folded & twisted leaf style, light brown & green dried leaf with a clean aroma
Style/Shape: long, strip-style leaf
Plucking Style: hand-plucked
Cultivar: Da Hong Pao
Oxidation: 40-45% oxidation
Roasting: charcoal-fired, medium roasting in the traditional manner
Flavor: a hint of nuts, toast, plain biscuits
Aroma: fruity aromas, no florals, with
Liquor: medium-amber color liquor fades at the edges

 

Wu Yi Shan
Fujian Province, China

2016 Spring Pluck
(late April, early May)

Note:

 

Oolongs are traditionally ‘rinsed’ before being steeped.
This is done with a quick application of hot water that is poured over the tea in the gaiwan or teapot and then immediately discarded.
The rinse water is not drunk – its purpose is to help the leaves begin to open during steeping.
Use  additional appropriately-heated water for the 1st steeping and subsequent re-steepings.

 

Note On Steeping Oolong:

 

Oolong exemplifies the concept that some teas can be re-steeped multiple times and yield an incredible volume of drinkable tea. This practice works best when the leaf is steeped in a small vessel, but it also works reasonably well using a large teapot. Please refer to our steeping instructions for details.

 

Western-style steeping medium-large sized teapot 20-32 ounces:

 

Use 1 Tablespoon (2-3 grams) of tea per each 6 oz water
Rinse the tea in your teapot with a quick application of hot water
Immediately discard this liquid
Add additional hot water to start the 1st steepingRe-steep 2-3 infusions at 2-3 minutes each
Water temperature should be 195°F- 205°F

 

Asian-style steeping in a small teapot under 10 oz or in a gaiwan:

 

Use 2 Tablespoons (4-6 grams) of tea per each 6 oz water
Rinse the tea in your teapot with a quick application of hot water
Immediately discard this liquid
Add additional hot water to start the 1st steepingRe-steep 6-8 infusions (or more!) at 10 seconds to 1 minute each
Water temperature should be 195°F-205°F

This special Da Hong Pao oolong is from a small family plot in the Wu Yi Shan. The leaf is grown without any cultivation or manipulation by human gardeners – it is from truly wild-grown tea bushes. We see this type of garden throughout east Asia, and it is remarkable the unique tastes that leaf can have when it is harvested from wild-grown bushes.

We discovered this limited-production Da Hong Pao during our tasting of Da Hong Pao teas this year. This particular garden, being wild and untended, is only be plucked twice a year: first in May and again in September. Only a small amount of tea (about 30kg) is produced in this garden per year.

Tea Trekker’s Da Hong Pao’s Wild-Grown flavor profile ranges from the simple underlying notes of the classic Wu Yi oolong base tea to include the clean flavors of peat, toast and astringent nut. The presence of astringency is unusual and provides a fresh, lively, and brisk characteristic that is rare in a Da Hong Pao.

Its complex floral aromatics are cacao, rich florals such as osmanthus, magnolia, and orchid, all of which are unusual in a Wu Yi oolong. Aromas in these teas tend to run more to fuity notes. This oolong is more highly roasted than others of our yan cha, but is not a heavily-roasted finished leaf. The liquor has a sweet, full body and is a delight to sip. The color is a clear medium amber that fades to the edges. The leaf is a gorgeously mottled light brown & green that shows expert oxidation and handling.

img-bobml_wuyi_shan

Bob & Mary Lou at the stone marker in Tong Mu announcing this place as the original home of Lapsang Souchong tea

 

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