Fenghuang Dan Cong Mi Lan Xiang AA

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Oolong Tea
dan cong

 

Fenghuang Dan Cong Mi Lan Xiang AA
(Honey Orchid Fragrance)

Appearance: Individual, open, slightly-twisted flat leaf
Style/Shape: Long, strip-style leaf
Plucking Style: Hand-plucked
Oxidation: 30-35% oxidation
Roasting: Charcoal-fired, medium roasting in the traditional manner
Flavor: Slightly bold flavor, the floral qualities are enhanced but not overpowered by the roasting
Aroma: Enticing fragrance of wood and various flowers
Liquor: light reddish-orange color tea liquor

 

 

Wu Dong Mountain
Guangdong Province, China

2017 Late Spring Pluck
(late May, early June)

Western-style steeping in a medium-large sized teapot 20-32 ounces:

 

Use 1.5 Tablespoons (2-3 grams) of tea per each 6 oz water
Rinse the tea in your teapot with a quick application of hot water
Immediately discard this liquid
Add additional hot water to start the 1st steeping
Re-steep 2-3 infusions at 2-3 minutes each
Water temperature should be 195°F-205°F

 

Asian-style steeping in a small teapot under 10 oz or in a gaiwan:

 

Use 2.5 Tablespoons (4-6 grams) of tea per each 6 oz water
Rinse the tea in your teapot with a quick application of hot water
Immediately discard this liquid
Add additional hot water to start the 1st steeping
Re-steep 6-8 infusions (or more!) at 10 seconds to 1 minute each
Water temperature should be 195°F-205°F

 

Note:

 

Oolongs are traditionally ‘rinsed’ before being steeped.
This is done with a quick application of hot water that is poured over the tea in the gaiwan or teapot and then immediately discarded.
The rinse water is not drunk – its purpose is to help the leaves begin to open during steeping.
Use  additional, appropriately-heated water, for the 1st true steeping and subsequent re-steepings.

 

Note on Steeping Oolong:

 

Oolongs exemplify the concept that some teas can be re-steeped multiple times and yield an incredible volume of drinkable liquid tea. This practice works best when the leaf is steeped in a small vessel, but it also works reasonably well in a large teapot.
Please refer to our steeping instructions for details.

Map Coming Soon!

Fenghuang dan cong teas are made from fresh leaf plucked from tea trees (not tea bushes) which are known as ‘single trunk’ tea trees. The teas are identified by flavor and aroma profile (floral, spicy, etc) that are classified as ‘fragrances’.

Over 30 different ‘fragrances’ have been classified and each fragrance corresponds to the genetic lineage of the tea trees. The most delicious teas are manufactured using leaf from the oldest tea trees (100-300 years of age) that have individual characteristics, growth habits, and shapes  which ultimately combine to create the signature ‘fragrances’.

 

The leaf of this Mi Lan Xiang AA 2017 is a bit larger than some of our recent dan cong harvests, and the color of the leaf is less mottled with the light patches and interesting color variation that one often sees in a dan cong. The dark coloration that does exist in the leaf is due to a short, additional roasting, which provides the finished leaf with an austere quality, similar to that of a good yan cha.

What captured our attention, though, was the intensity of sweet flavor in the tea liquor. It stood up loud and clear to the roasting, and revealed a splendid dan cong floral aroma, too. This tea is a happy marriage of charcoal roasting and floral elegance – wood and flower.

Overall, this tea has a big personality, and for those who find dan congs too floral (and prefer a more masculine yan cha instead), this may be your perfect dan cong. Conversely, if you find the roast style a bit too dominant for your taste, just put the tea on a plate and leave it open to the air for a few hours. Then fluff the leaves to turn them, and air them out for a little more time. As with any roasted tea, the high points of aroma from the charcoal will soften with time and exposure to air.

We believe this dan cong leaf will age beautifully and gracefully. Consider putting some aside for an important celebration, or just future tea drinking enjoyment.