Fuliang Black

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Black Tea

 

Fuliang Black

 

Appearance: Slender, tightly-twisted, thin pluck with a slight curl
Manufacture: orthodox hong cha manufacture
Oxidation: fully-oxidized
Flavor: smooth, complex and sweet flavor suggestive of dried fruit
Aroma: rich and soft aroma redolent of dried fruit and grape skins
Liquor: clear, red amber-color liquor with little sediment

 

FuLiang Region
(modern-day Jingdezhen)
Jiangxi Province, China

2017 Spring Pluck (May, June)

Use a generous 1 Tablespoon (2-3 grams) per 6 oz water
Steep 1 infusion at 3-5 minutes
Water temperature should be 190°F-200°F

 

Steeping Tip:

 

This richly-flavored black tea should be able to be steeped more than one time, especially if the initial steeping is less than four minutes. We do not recommend over-steeping this tea during any particular one steeping.

Due to the slender and curled shape of the leaf, it is imperative to use enough leaf.  This is not your grandmother’s ‘a teaspoon per cup‘ type of tea. Because the leaf is so loose-filling in the measure, and you will be steeping the leaf at least a second time, in order to have the 3 grams that are appropriate to use, it is necessary to use at least 1 Tablespoon per 6 ounces of water.

If you do not use enough leaf, the steeped tea will be thin and watery – quite the opposite of the big, bold, smooth flavor that this leaf will have when measured by weight.

About the FuLiang region around Jingdezhen:

This area was one of the first places that we visited on our first trip to China in 2000, and we have re-visited it to source many of its delicious teas and functional teawares.

The area known as “FuLiang” is located in north-eastern Jiangxi Province, nestled in just to the west and south of the ‘holy trinity’ of tea provinces:  Anhui, Zhejiang, and Fujian  Provinces. Now known as Jingdezhen, this region is well-known for its porcelain and ceramics production (including many teawares), but it is not as well known for its tea, even though this is a very important area in Chinese tea history. How could it not be with so much notable tea production all around it – to the east as mentioned, and to the west and south are the also-important, varied tea-producing provinces of Hubei, Hunan, and Guangdong.

Jiangxi Province in general and the FuLiang area of it in specific, is a stunning region of steep mountains and bamboo forests, with many settlements that date back to summer residences of both wealthy and powerful Chinese and later, westerners, who were all  escaping the heat of the summer in the major cities that have been so densely populated for centuries. There are varied and interesting examples of architecture of many of the people who have had either permanent or seasonal residences and businesses in the region. Many of these are particularly noticeable on Lu Shan, from which we still source a fine green tea during the P.Q.M. Spring Green Tea season.

 

 

We have had many, many spectacular teas from this region of FuLiang, which is located all-around the porcelain center of Jingdezhen. However, these have been mostly mid-season spring green teas. Some of you may remember what was Mary Lou’s all-time favorite green tea: Ming Mei, which we sourced for many years back in the ‘aughts’ and into the early 2010’s.

This delicious, richly-flavored, mid-season green tea was from one of China’s first certified organic tea-growing gardens (located in Jiangxi), a tea that is now highly-sought-after on the domestic Chinese tea market and that has been virtually priced out of the export market.

Jiangxi Province in general and the FuLiang area of it in specific, is a stunning region of steep mountains and bamboo forests, with many settlements that date back to summer residences of both wealthy and powerful Chinese and later, westerners, who were all  escaping the heat of the summer in the major cities that have been so densely populated for centuries. There are varied and interesting examples of architecture of many of the people who have had either permanent or seasonal residences and businesses in the region. Many of these are particularly noticeable on Lu Shan, from which we still source a fine green tea during the P.Q.M. Spring Green Tea season.

However, we are currently blessed with a delicious and special black tea from this region. This is quite exciting, and we have been hinting at its arrival for a month or so now… Made from the same leaf plantings as the green tea in the area (as with Keemun tea, whose leaf was historically made into green tea, but then a tea maker long ago decided to think outside the box and made some black tea with the leaf and history was made!).

So the pluck used in this new black tea is what in green tea would be called a mao jian: one leaf and a bud.

The flavor is jam-packed. It is rich, full-bodied, quite ‘raisin-y‘, and is (we think) best drunk neat, or plain, but it does accept milk quite readily so if that is how you prefer your liquid tea, then try it both ways. This is what we like to call a ‘sturdy’ black tea – one that has incredible structure. Because of the incredible terroir of the area the growing conditions are superb and this tea reflects that. It has neither the cacao-like aroma of its black tea neighbors to the east in Fujian Province, nor the spicy, winey focused flavor of the Keemuns to the north.

The leaf is slender, whole  leaf, and beautiful to look at, much more interesting than its cousin the Keemun congou. It is more like the Keemun Mao Feng A++ but more slender and much more deeply-flavored. The leaf does not erupt in size the way the new Bai Lin does (it has the most remarkable increase in size when rehydrated!)

The aromatic qualities of our Fuliang Black are bright and intoxicating – mostly in the wet leaf – with nuance of raisin and dried fruit.

We think that our new Fuliang Black is elegant, slightly sweet, and has a finish that lingers.

The liquor is clear but with high soluble solids, and is a deep, rich claret color.

The area known as “Fuliang” is located in north-eastern Jiangxi Province, nestled in just to the west and south of the ‘holy trinity’ of tea provinces:  Anhui, Zhejiang, and Fujian  Provinces. Now known as Jingdezhen, this region is well-known for its porcelain and ceramics production (including many teawares), but it is not as well known for its tea, even though this is a very important area in Chinese tea history. How could it not be with so much notable tea production all around it – to the east as mentioned, and to the west and south are the also-important, varied tea-producing provinces of Hubei, Hunan, and Guangdong.

This area was one of the first places that we visited on our first trip to China in 2000, and we have re-visited it to source many of its delicious teas and functional teawares.