2017 Shan Lin Xi oolong tea

Shan Lin Xi Spring Pluck

$30.00$232.00

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Oolong Tea
High Mountain Oolong – gao shan

 

Shan Lin Xi

 

Appearance: tight dark green pellets
Style/Shape: semiball-rolled leaf with few stems
Plucking Style: hand-plucked
Oxidation: 20-30 % oxidation
Roasting: Un-roasted
Flavor: rich, appealing flavor, with a combination of classic ‘high mountain crispness’ and
a balanced dose of stone and mineraly-ness
Aroma: superb fresh aroma – sweet and woodsy in equal measure
Liquor: clear, green-gold tea liquor


Shan Lin Xi Tea Harvesting District, Dragon-Phoenix Valley
Zhushan Township, Nantou County, Taiwan
Garden elevation: 5,900 feet elevation

2017 Spring Pluck
(early May)

Western-style steeping in a medium-large teapot 25-32 ounces:

 

Use 2 teaspoons (2-3 grams) of tea per each 6 oz water
Place the tea in your teapot or gaiwan and rinse the tea with a quick application of hot water
Immediately pour off this water and add more hot water for the 1st infusion
Re-steep upwards of 3 infusions (or more!) at 2 minutes each
Water temperature should be 180°F-190°F

 

Asian-style steeping in small teapot under 10 oz or in a gaiwan:

 

Use 4 teaspoons (4-6 grams) of tea per each 5-6 oz water
Place the tea in your teapot or gaiwan and rinse the tea with a quick application of hot water
Immediately pour off this water and add more hot water for the 1st infusion
Re-steep upwards of 6-8 infusions (or more!) at 35 seconds to 1 minute each
Water temperature should be 180°F-190°F

Note:

 

Oolongs are traditionally ‘rinsed’ before being steeped.
This is done with a quick application of hot water that is poured over the tea in the gaiwan or teapot and then immediately discarded.
The rinse water is not drunk – its purpose is to help the leaves begin to open during steeping.
Use  additional appropriately-heated water for the 1st steeping and subsequent re-steepings.

 

Note on Steeping Oolong:

 

Oolongs exemplify the concept that some teas can be re-steeped multiple times and yield an incredible volume of drinkable tea. This idea works best when the leaf is steeped in a small vessel, but it also works reasonably well using a large teapot.
Please refer to our steeping instructions for details

Perhaps the most glorious of all the Taiwan high mountain oolongs known as gao shan.

If you have yet to experience the spectacular nature of gao shan, then we recommend beginning with this Shan Lin Xi oolong. It has a captivating aroma and a very rich mouthfeel. In the cup the flavor has stone and mineral highlights on the backside of the fruit, and the body is creamy and chewy – a sign of a desirably high degree of amino acid in the leaf.

The Shan Lin Xi growing area is close to the Tung Ting area, only much higher in elevation. This gao shan has some of the delicious softness of Tung Ting, but with a larger dose of crisp, high mountain jazz. The aroma is clean and cool – very reminiscent of the cool air that emanates close-by a fast-running mountain stream. The aroma is persistent and fresh, and the flavor is refreshing and sweet with an earthy undertone.

This may be my favorite gao shan – I like its richness, softness and roundness on the palate. There is nothing shy about this tea, but it stops short of being as stony and ‘green’ as an Alishan or Li Shan can quite often be. In fact, the first time I opened a package of Shan Lin Xi in Taiwan I was stopped in my tracks by its intense freshness and captivating range of aromas.

Shan Lin Xi teas are extremely aromatic and the perfect tea for those who want a little more complexity than what is found in Tung Ting but less assertiveness than Alishan and Li Shan.

Mary Lou
Spring, 2016

Want to Know More?

img-more_gao_shan High Mountain Gao Shan: Taiwan’s Most Distinctive Teas